– The best resource for educational games for children

There are lots of games for children. And some of them are also educational. However, the problem is that most learning games are just not fun and exciting and your kids stop playing them because they get predictable and boring. is a website which reviews contemporary popular games, which are proven to be fun AND which have educational aspects as well.  Continue reading

Doodle’idu! Legal issues of user test recruitment in Germany

Recruitment of participants is a necessary and essential part of user testing. While many researchers in the industry prefer to “buy test users” via a third-party service provider, some of us have decided to do everything on our own. This provides a greater level of control because we can apply our own screening process, but also sometimes makes it difficult to find the right amount of people who meet all your desired criteria. This is especially true if your own panel is not that large yet. For those in Germany, certain strict legal concerns must also be given serious consideration. This article is intended to provide recommendations on best practices, drawn from our daily experience, on handling this delicate topic. Continue reading

G4C Game Design Competition

April this year, announced a game design competition. The goal was to provide a game design document about a game that “will motivate teens to explore sexuality and give them a safe environment to experiment with and understand what behaviors are healthy”. Unfortunately I did not win, however, I will briefly present my concept. You can also check out the three finalists, which presented their concepts on the Games for Change Festival 2013 in New York City. Continue reading

The meaning of choice

Every game confronts us with choices, which is not surprising at all since games are per definition an interactive medium. Of course, there are skill-based games which demand from the player to givie a pre-defined input without giving him/her any choice as it might seem. But even then, a minimum level of choice is always there. For example, if the seemingly simple task is to click a button at a certain moment, it’s up to the player to make an estimation how long it takes (physically) to press the button and to decide on the right timing for his/hers decision to actually press the button. And it’s up to the game designer to make sure that players are confronted with the optimal level of appropriate choices (defining complexity) to achieve the best results in terms of fun, engagement and conversion. In the following, I will discuss the effects of choice on the gameplay experience and which consequences it might have for the monetization of a game. Continue reading